Publications

Training and development of instructor-leadership

A body of research on instructors’ use of leadership behaviors in higher education teaching, often called instructor-leadership, is gaining momentum. Despite the field’s growth, the practical recommendations emerging from empirical investigations of instructor-leadership remain largely underdeveloped. In particular, the most popular practical implication – training and development of instructor-leadership – is given fleeting attention. In light of this, the present paper aims to provide detailed guidelines on the training and development of instructor-leadership by drawing from both the instructor-leadership and training and development bodies of literature. In so doing, this paper utilizes the instructional systems design approach to provide guidelines according to assessment, design, implementation, and evaluation.

For the full article see here: Training and development of instructor-leadership: An instructional systems design approach

A moderated mediation model of bullying, support, justice, and organizational outcomes

Drawing on social exchange theory, this study investigated (a) justice as a mechanism in the relationship between workplace bullying and organizational commitment, organizational citizenship behavior, and turnover intent; (b) perceived organizational support as a moderator of the mediating relationships; and (c) reactions of both targets and bystanders of workplace bullying. Quantitative data were collected using a survey design for which 500 employees from Trinidad and Tobago responded. The findings supported the mediating effects of (a) procedural justice for affective and normative commitment and turnover intent, and (b) interactional justice for affective and normative commitment and organizational citizenship behavior (to individuals). These findings for procedural justice were consistent for the bystander, but procedural justice also mediated the relationship between bullying and organizational citizenship behavior (to organization). Interactional justice was not a significant mediator for bystanders. The moderated-mediation effects of perceived organizational support on turnover intent and organizational citizenship behavior (to individuals) for exposed employees were supported. Theoretical contributions, limitations, and practical implications are discussed.

For the full article, see here: A moderated mediation model of bullying, support, justice, and organizational outcomes

Organizational embeddedness in Trinidad’s government ministries

There is a dearth of research on antecedents of organizational embeddedness, and the small body of research that exists rarely focuses on (1) how personal and situational factors interact and (2) public-sector organizations in lesser-developed nations. In light of these research gaps, the purpose of this paper is to investigate (1) personality as a predictor
of organizational embeddedness, and (2) the moderating role of perceived organizational support in the personality-embeddedness relationship at government ministries in Trinidad. Quantitative data were collected from 180 employees at five government ministries. The findings did not support the hypotheses, and instead showed that age and perceived organizational support predicted organizational embeddedness. This study contributes to
organizational embeddedness research by highlighting the reasons why a lesser developed nation’s public sector context may invalidate any personality effects typically found in a private sector context. Limitations, suggestions for future research, and practical implications are discussed.

Read the article here: Predicting organizational embeddedness in Trinidad’s government ministries: The role of personality and perceived organizational support

Authentic instructor-leadership, student engagement and performance, and leader distance

In higher education teaching, a leadership lens is used to conceptualize teaching quality as ‘instructor-leadership’. Instructor-leadership research has largely focused on transactional and transformational leadership. But, increasing student distress along with the existence of mediocrity and abusiveness in higher education teaching warrants the study of authentic instructor-leadership. The aims of this study are to show that (a) authentic instructor-leadership is related to students’ academic performance via the mechanism of student engagement and (b) leader distance moderates the relationship between authentic instructor-leadership and student engagement. 

Read pre-print here

The dimensionality and measurement of destructive instructor-leadership

The conceptualization of destructive leadership has received increasing attention in recent times. Accordingly, researchers have developed a theoretical model of destructive leadership that highlights two manifestations as follows: (1) leading followers towards goals that contradict the organization’s interests and (2) the use of harmful methods in leading followers. The two manifestations of destructive leadership point to the concept being multidimensional. However, researchers rarely investigate the dimensionality of destructive leadership when measuring the concept in general and in instructor-student relationships. Moreover, the most prominent measure of destructive leadership fails to capture its two manifestations adequately. To address the apparent mismatch between the theory and measurement of destructive instructor-leadership, we enhance an existing measure of destructive leadership. Using a sample of 174 students from the UK, the findings indicated that the two manifestations of destructive instructor-leadership can be measured by 13 items, and was composed of three dimensions including, irresponsibility, victimization, and callous communication. These findings, along with limitations and suggestions for future research are discussed.

APA Reference:

Balwant, P. T., Birdi, K., & Stephan, U. (2019). The dimensionality and measurement of destructive instructor-leadership. International Journal of Leadership in Education, 1–23. https://doi.org/10.1080/13603124.2018.1543803

Transformational instructor-leadership, student engagement, and academic performance

Researchers are becoming increasingly interested in the use of transformational leadership theory in higher education teaching (often referred to as transformational instructor-leadership). Much of this body of research investigates a direct association between transformational instructor-leadership and student outcomes. In the present study, we take a step further by investigating (a) student engagement as a mechanism in the relationship between transformational instructor-leadership and students’ academic performance and (b) structural distance as a moderator of the relationship between transformational instructor-leadership and student engagement. For more on this study click HERE.

APA Reference:

Balwant, Paul T., Birdi, K., Stephan, U., & Topakas, A. (2018). Transformational instructor-leadership and academic performance: a moderated mediation model of student engagement and structural distance. Journal of Further and Higher Education, 1–17. https://doi.org/10.1080/0309877X.2017.1420149

Stay Close! Leader Distance, Transformational Leadership, Engagement, and Performance in Undergraduate Project Teams

Research on leadership and transformational leadership has largely focused on supervisor-employee dynamics, which are characterized by traditional hierarchical structures. However, project teams also appear conducive to transformational leadership. The aims of this study are to show that (a) transformational leadership is related to project teams’ performance via the mechanism of work engagement and (b) leader distance moderates the relationship between transformational leadership and work engagement. The proposed moderated mediation model was tested using 180 students in an undergraduate management course and working in project teams. For more on this study, including findings and implications, click HERE.

APA Reference:

Balwant, Paul T. (2017). Stay Close! Leader Distance, Transformational Leadership, Engagement, and Performance in Teams. Academy of Management Proceedings, 2017(1), 10785. https://doi.org/10.5465/AMBPP.2017.10785abstract

The Meaning of Student Engagement and Disengagement in the Classroom Context

Despite the popularity of student engagement and, by association, student
disengagement, the academic literature is unclear about the meaning of
these terms. This review extends existing conceptual studies of student
engagement by offering clear defnitions and conceptualisations of both
student engagement and disengagement in the classroom context.
To develop these conceptualisations, the present review draws upon
organisational behaviour theory on work engagement and disengagement
because the literature in this discipline is notably more refined than in
educational research. Click here to read the published article and here for the pre-print full-text.

APA Reference:

Balwant, Paul T. (2017). The meaning of student engagement and disengagement in the classroom context: lessons from organisational behaviour. Journal of Further and Higher Education, 0(0), 1–13. https://doi.org/10.1080/0309877X.2017.1281887